ABOUT:

Roseau River is an Anishinabe Nation community located in Anishinabe territory, also known as Treaty 1 territory. This area is also now known as southern Manitoba, just north of the United States-Canada border.

Roseau River 2A, the main reserve, is at the junction of the Red and Roseau Rivers, with another portion, Roseau River 2A (Roseau Rapids), located on the escarpment 20 miles east of the main reserve. The main reserve includes excellent farmland, surrounded by dense foliage and trees, while Roseau Rapids has pasturelands and some natural resources such as gravel and sand. Each has a river running through it.

The Roseau River Anishinabe Nation is an Ojibway-speaking people of the Anishinabe Nation.

The Roseau River Reservation consists of two parcels of land that make up a total of 7,576 acres. The largest piece of land, approximately 5,276 acres, is located 4 kilometres east of Hwy 75, adjacent to the Red River on Hwy 201, and the other 2,300 acres, known as Roseau River Rapids, located on the Roseau River, 5 kilometres east of Hwy 218 and 4 kilometres north of Hwy 201. Both properties are readily accessible by Provincial Hwy’s 201 and 218. The regional land characteristics for both Reserves include excellent farmland conditions, surrounded by dense foliage and trees. Each has a river running through it.

 

RRAFN GOVERNMENT:

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

The Roseau River Anishinabe Nation is comprised of three levels of local government that make up the Executive. Presently the community is under the leadership of the Custom Council, which is an alternate to section 74 of the Indian Act. The function in brief is as follows:

 

THE ELDERS: (JUDICIAL BRANCH)

The direction at all times to administrate community business and local politics come from the Elders Council. The decisions are based on the wisdom of the elders. The Elders Council comprise of 7 community Elders.

 

CHIEF AND COUNCIL: (EXECUTIVE BRANCH)

The Chief and Council system provide the political function for the community of Roseau River. It is comprised of one elected Chief and four elected Councillors. Each elected official is given portfolios for their duties. Decisions are passed through the Custom Council, and the Elders

CUSTOM COUNCIL: (LEGISLATIVE BRANCH)

The Custom Council is comprised of family representatives that sit in for that family unit. The family, through meetings, etc, does this process through appointment. The representatives have the authority to make decisions on behalf of the community in all areas of local government operations. The usual number of representatives is 21 members.

 

RRAFN LAND AND RESOURCES:

The Roseau River Anishinabe Nation is a member of the Ojibway Nation of First Peoples, also referred to as "Anishinabe". The early French explorers referred to the Ojibway as the Saulteaux Indians. This name has been widely used up until the late 1970's by most Ojibway Peoples. In fact, towards the north and east of Manitoba, including parts of western Ontario, Ojibway People still refer to themselves as the Saulteaux.

Most of the membership that lives off Reserve resides in major city centres across United States, Canada, Mexico and Great Britain. Some live in remote areas such as northern Manitoba, while others live in local towns in surrounding municipalities close to the vicinity of the Reserve. As well, there is member’s spread across different areas throughout the United States, some as far away as California. (2002 Indian and Northern Affairs figures and Roseau administration statistics.

 

RRAFN POPULATION:

The Roseau River, Roseau Rapids Reserves have population figures of:

1931 Total on and off Reserve Membership
1011 On Reserve 52%/ 920 Off Reserve 48%

920 Total membership living off the Reserve
432 Male 47%/ 488 Female 53%

1011 Total membership living on the Reserve
527 Male 52%/ 484 Female 48%

13 Total On Reserve non-Membership only
6 Male 46%/ 7 Female 54%

 

NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCES:

  • Industrial
  • Water, Home Industrial irrigation

 

RENEWABLE

  • Forests
  • Fur
  • Game
  • Wild rice
  • Plant life
  • Agricultural Capacity
    . Cereal and foliage
    · Arable land
    · Vegetables
    · Fruit
    · Livestock

 

TREATY NO.1 :(1871)

Treaty No. 1 was negotiated and entered into in August 1871 at Lower Fort Garry. A few of the Canadian communities sharing the obligations and benefits of Treaty No. 1 include: Winnipeg, Brandon, Portage La Prairie, Selkirk, Steinbach, Lundar, Grand Beach, Emerson, Winkler and many more.

Treaty No. 1 was negotiated and entered into in August 1871 at Lower Fort Garry. A few of the Canadian communities sharing the obligations and benefits of Treaty No. 1 include: Winnipeg, Brandon, Portage La Prairie, Selkirk, Steinbach, Lundar, Grand Beach, Emerson, Winkler and many more.  

 

TRUST LANDS:

Richer, Manitoba (access to Gravel)

 

HWY 6: 75 Acres located on Highway 6 and the Perimeter

30 VLT's and Smoking area.

 

DOWNLOAD THE TREATY 1 DOCUMENT - CLICK HERE